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Evolution of plumage coloration in the crow family (Corvidae) with a focus on the color-producing microstructures in the feathers: a comparison of eight species

Lee, S. I., Kim, M., Choe, J. C., & Jablonski, P. G. The alula is a small structure located at the joint between the hand-wing and arm-wing of birds and is known to be used in slow flight with high angles of attack such as landing. It is assumed to function similarly to

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Antarcitc skuas recognize individual humans

Lee, W. Y., Han, Y. D., Jablonski, P. G., Jung, J. W., & Kim, J. H. Recent findings report that wild animals can recognize individual humans. To explain how the animals distinguish humans, two hypotheses are proposed. The high cognitive abilities hypothesis implies that pre-existing high intelligence enabled animals to acquire such abilities.

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Predators induce conditions for size-dependent alternative reproductive tactics in a water strider male

Han, C. S., & Jablonski, P. G. Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) are commonly associated with differences in morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. The morphological differences can be associated with differences between ARTs in effectiveness of sexual display but the relationship has rarely been documented. We tested it using the Asian water strider Gerris gracilicornis

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Flucutating sexual selection and the evolution of a courtship strategy

Han, C. S., Brooks, R. C., & Jablonski, P. G. Fluctuating sexual selection caused by environmental heterogeneity can maintain variation in sexual signals. Sexual selection can also shape correlations among behavioral traits (behavioral syndromes) when certain behavioral combinations enjoy greater fitness than other combinations (i.e., under correlational sexual selection). Here, we tested the

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Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes

Dufresnes, C., Majtyka, T., Baird, S.J., Gerchen, J.F., Borzée, A., Savary, R., Ogielska, M., Perrin, N. and Stöck, M. Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to

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The function of the alula in avian flight

Kim, J., Park, H., Jabłoński, P. G., & Choi, H. The alula is a small structure located at the joint between the hand-wing and arm-wing of birds and is known to be used in slow flight with high angles of attack such as landing. It is assumed to function similarly to a leading-edge

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Jumping on water, surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects

Koh, J.S., Yang, E., Jung, G.P., Jung, S.P., Son, J.H., Lee, S.I., Jablonski, P.G., Wood, R.J., Kim, H.Y. and Cho, K.J. Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension–dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and

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Proximate mechanisms of detecting nut properties in a wild population of Mexican Jays (Aphelocoma ultramarina)

Jablonski, P. G., Fuszara, E., Fuszara, M., Jeong, C., & Lee, W. Y. In contrast to extensive research on optimal foraging in birds, the proximate mechanisms by which birds estimate the properties of nuts or seeds have not been well studied. Using slow-motion video-recording and experiments with modified peanuts presented to birds in

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Camouflage through behavior in moths: the role of background matching in disruptive coloration

Kang, C., Stevens, M., Moon, J. Y., Lee, S. I., & Jablonski, P. G. Camouflage can be attained via mechanisms such as background matching (resembling the general background) and disruptive coloration (hindering the detection of an animal’s outline). However, despite much conceptual work with artificial stimuli there have to date been few studies

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Effect of sex, hunger and relative body size on the use of ripple signals in the interactions among water striders Gerris latiabdominis

Son, J. H., Han, C. S., & Jablonski, P. G. Water striders use ripple signals in aggressive interactions between individuals for access to food. We asked whether water striders produce ripple signals more frequently when they are hungrier and when the value of food resources is higher. We also asked if and how

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